19 Questions for Faculty Metacognition

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“Promoting Student Metacognition” (article pdf) provides 30+ “Sample Self-Questions to Promote Faculty Metacognition about Teaching” -- both for individual class sessions and for overall courses.

  • These are useful starters/guides for reflection questions/journaling and self-assessment of one's instructional practices.

A. Class Session

1. Planning

  • "What are my goals for this class session? How did I arrive at these goals?"
  • "What do I think students already know about this topic? What evidence do I have for my thinking?" 
  • "How could I make this material personally relevant for my students? Why do I think this?"
  • "What mistakes did I make last time I taught this, and how can I not repeat these?"

2. Monitoring

  • "What do I notice about how students are behaving during this class session? Why do I think this is happening?"
  • "What language or active-learning strategies am I using that appear to be facilitating learning? Impeding learning?"
  • "How is the pace of the class going? What could I do right now to improve the class session?"

3. Evaluating

  • "How do I think today's class session went? Why do I think that? What evidence do I have?"
  • "How did the ideas of today's class session relate to previous class sessions? To what extent do I think students saw those connections?"
  • "How will what I think about how today's class session went influence my preparations for next time?"

B. Overall Course 

1. Planning

  • "Why do I think it's important for students pursuing a variety of careers to learn the ideas in my course? What are my assumptions?"
  • "How does success in this course relate to my students' career goals? How might I reveal these connections to them?"
  • "What do I want students to be able to do by the end of this course? Still be able to do 5 years later?"

2. Monitoring

  • "In what ways am I effectively reaching my goals for students through my teaching? How could I expand on these successful strategies?"
  • "In what ways is my approach to teaching in this course not helping students learn? How could I change my teaching strategies to address this?"
  • "How is my approach to teaching this course different from last time I taught it? Why?"

3. Evaluating

  • "What evidence do I have that students in my course learned what I think they learned?"
  • "What advice would I give to students next year about how to learn the most in this course?"
  • "If I were to teach this course again, how would I change it? Why? What might keep me from making these changes?"
  • "How is my thinking about teaching changing?"
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